Caregiver on the Go, Vol 2 (Caregiver on the Go, Vol. 2 of 6)

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When to use: To open conversation and generate ideas. It could also be used at the end of a session to wrap up. Suggested for partial-day and one-day events. Purpose: To provide a framework for understanding and decision-making, for reviewing strategy, position and direction of a group or idea.

Benefit: Organizes data into a logical format to help a group understand, present, discuss and make decisions. The analysis identifies concerns that need attention and leads to action.

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This tool can be used by participants to prepare before coming to the event or used as a take-home exercise after an event for future action planning. When to use: For brainstorming at meetings and workshops. Best used at one-day ideas-exchange events.


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Group size: Any. Small groups of 5—8 participants and small group analysis could be shared with the larger group to identify similarities and differences. Previous knowledge required: Some knowledge about risk factors and protective factors related to social isolation can be presented before the exercise and of the community. Purpose: To list informal connections and plan to strengthen the network to achieve a purpose. It also plans opportunities to strengthen existing contacts and to access new resources.

This could be a take-home exercise for participants, before or after an event, to build momentum for planning action. When to use: To list existing contacts for planning action. Suggested for one-day ideas-exchange event. Previous knowledge required: Participants should have good knowledge of their community and its services. Benefit: Participants list all ideas on a single page and then combine them to make one concise statement of their theory of change.

This could also be a take-home exercise for participants after the event to build momentum for planning action. When to use: When goals are not yet clear, for participants to agree on goals, their impact, and how to achieve them. Group size: Small groups of 5—8 participants and small group analysis should be shared with the larger group to identify similarities and differences.

Previous knowledge required: Participants should have some knowledge about social isolation and social innovation presented at two-day ideas exchange event. Complexity: Medium. Facilitator requires good knowledge of principles of social innovation and theory of change. Purpose: To develop a common plan for a group to work together towards in response to a major challenge in the community. Benefit: Can solve or bring important change to complex community problems e. Each sector shares how it sees the problem and they work together to create a common vision and action plan.

Participants share findings and supporting activities. When to use: To develop a community plan to address social isolation in the community when several organizations are involved. Suggested for the two-day ideas exchange event. Previous knowledge required: Participants need to know about their community and its services.

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They should have information about the collective impact model and how to develop an impact plan before doing the exercise. Preparation requires considerable time, commitment and effort. Facilitator must have good understanding of the collective impact model and how to develop an impact plan. For a community to put a plan of action in place to address social isolation, it is very important to keep momentum after the ideas exchange events.

If too much time goes by between an event and follow-up discussions, it is easy for participants to move on to other tasks and ideas. These suggestions will help participants who want to take an innovative solution to social isolation to the next level:.

Note: It is important that the community relate to the example. Adapt it as necessary.

Event Information

Use the following case study for both activities. Give participants a copy of the case study and have them work together in small groups to analyze it, using the questions for either Activity 1 or 2. Make sure that each table includes participants from different sectors. Each group should choose a secretary and a reporter. At the end of the activity the reporter reports back to the large group. The facilitator writes points on a flip chart. At the end of the day, the group secretaries give their notes to the facilitator.

Troy is a small prairie town within commuting distance from the city where most health, social and recreational services are situated. There are a high number of older seniors in Troy and the surrounding areas that have lived there for a long time. Unlike many other rural communities Troy is growing. There are also many working families and new retirees from the resource industry who have come to Troy.

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Many of those who have arrived in the last few years are recent immigrants to Canada making the community more culturally diverse than it used to be. The growing population has also added services and businesses to the small town. The municipality has surveyed seniors about their concerns.

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The older residents feel psychologically disconnected from their community because of the large number of incomers and resulting changes. Seniors living out of town are physically distanced from town by barriers related to winter weather, geography and transportation. Almost all seniors say they want to age in place, but appropriate, affordable housing and access to medical care are barriers to that. Many seniors are lonely and are at increased risk of social isolation because of mobility issues, caregiving responsibilities, or living alone.

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The municipality has convened a community-wide meeting to discuss the issues facing seniors. They have invited citizens, community organizations Legion, Lions, 4H, Big Sisters businesses Co-op, insurance company, restaurant, Troy Care Home and representatives from public organizations schools, library , faith groups and the provincial government. Ask participants to identify what they can do in their community after the event. To keep momentum after the event, write down the results of the activity and the steps participants commit to take in the next month. Groups will form around different issues.

Encourage participants to set follow-up meetings before they leave the event. Participants can add their contact information to a list to stay involved, with the understanding that it will be shared with other participants.

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Participants complete event feedback form Appendix F: Event feedback form. The facilitator writes an event report Appendix G: Reporting template based on their observations, notes from group secretaries and completed feedback forms.

Facilitators should follow up with participants to share key issues from the event, especially those that need further exploration. Break into small groups. Each table should have participants from different sectors. Each group chooses a reporter and a secretary. The reporter reports back to the larger group. At the end of the day, group secretaries give their notes to the facilitator. Have each group discuss which seniors are at particular risk i. Once group participants agree, each group chooses a population to focus on, using the strategies below.

Groups can share the same focus. Otherwise, especially with a smaller audience, groups can address seniors in general.

Following the steps below each group focuses on one best practice strategy for addressing social isolation for the population they chose:. Think about the physical and social environments, programs and services that seniors need every day. Using the SWOT analysis template:. Using a social network webbing map groups identify connections they have or could develop to reach their goal. This exercise draws out resources in existing relationship networks and the steps to take in order to access those resources.

It also identifies opportunities for strengthening connections. Groups report their ideas to the large group.


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The audience can add their suggestions for other connections. The facilitator collects the information and summarizes it for the large group. The wrap-up session will show community readiness and commitment and should determine whether the event ends here or participants would like to continue discussing this topic over a second day.

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